Exhibition
07 Apr - 01 May 1976

Photograms and Further Experiments: Floris M. Neusüss

7 April - 1 May 1976

Professor Floris M. Neusüss teaches in Kassel at the Academy of Arts and has exhibited all over the world in the past ten years or so. His life size photograms are done mainly with nude models and his interest and exploration of scale and general relationships to things seen, their size and colour as changed by photography are made sometimes with himself as model and often with familiar objects such as matchboxes and cigarette packets.

Professor Neussüs has also organised an exhibition ‘Photography as Art – Art as Photography’ which was shown at Chalon sur Soane this summer and will probably be coming to the Imperial College gallery here. He was disappointed to get so little response from British photographers in this field and I will be interested to see the reaction from our visitors – not of course the small gang that only see photography as worthwhile if it has social relevance, who will dislike it on principle – but those people working in creative fields in this country. I think that Professor Neussüs’ work shows a peculiarly continental approach and one that has recently only been approached in England by painters using photography. Photography students may learn the techniques but as far as I am aware, they have mostly been disregarded when doing their own personal work in later years.  

Shown opposite ISFAHAN IN CAMERA: 19th Century Persia through the photographs of Ernst Holtzer

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